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Book 1: Character names, their meanings, and their possible significance

Dreamfall Chapters character names Book 1

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#21 europolis

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 19:19

"Umińska" is a quite rare surname in Poland. I think it can refer to Polish word "mina", which means "face, mien". So, this surname "Umińska" could be translated to "sb who make (pull) faces"...  :D



#22 msodkiewicz

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 19:35

"Umińska" is a quite rare surname in Poland. I think it can refer to Polish word "mina", which means "face, mien". So, this surname "Umińska" could be translated to "sb who make (pull) faces"...  :D

 

I'd rather say the name is totally generic. I checked Wikipedia if there was anyone significant with that name, but nope. If I had to make any far fetched guesses with the meaning it would rather come from verb "umieć" = "know/can/be able". RTG please help?


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#23 europolis

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 19:54

Some people mentioned on Wikipedia had this surname but I don't think they're really famous. And, probably your explanation of this surname is significantly better than mine.  ;)



#24 Mr_Russ

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 20:35

April_R, I know "tired" as "ayeph" in Hebrew.



#25 Layara

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:11

Ha, first time in (over?) ten years that I actually made use of my Biblical Hebrew dictionary - learned it in school, even got a proficiency degree, but my knowledge is fading away due to the fact that I hardly ever use it.

 

Anyway, the meaning of the name Leah in Biblical Hebrew is a bit unclear. The root לאה indeed means "tired, being weak, to try without sccess". But according to the dictionary, it could also derive from Assyric "littu" and possibly mean "cow" (it's related to the Egyptian word for "ibex"). Since her sister Rachel's name translates as "sheep", that's highly possible, even though Biblical Hebrew has a different word for cow. 



#26 Mr_Russ

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:18

My Hebrew is a little rusty. :) I was on an ulpan in Ein Tzurim (near Jerusalem) in the summer of 1987.



#27 Layara

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:29

I never learned Ivrit, and while Biblical and modern Hebrew share a lot of words, this may very well be one of the cases where they differ. And in my case, it's more than "a little rusty" - it reached Shitbot level. ;)

 

That's really awesome about attending an ulpan, though! I hope one day I'll be able to travel there myself.



#28 Mr_Russ

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:30

Oni medaber rak ksat ivrit! Then and now! :)



#29 Layara

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:42

Ani yoda'at rak milim achadot. ;)

 

Btw, looked it up, and "ayeph" means "tired" in Biblical Hebrew as well, but in the sense of growing weak from thirst. It's a secondary meaning, derived from "ayephah" - darkness. Funny how meanings sometimes shift!



#30 Mr_Russ

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 22:48

darkness - bedtime probably explains ayeph in modern Hebrew.



#31 Amistat

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 09:23

I'd rather say the name is totally generic. I checked Wikipedia if there was anyone significant with that name, but nope. If I had to make any far fetched guesses with the meaning it would rather come from verb "umieć" = "know/can/be able". RTG please help?

More surname had no meaning which Ur polish and u had to know that. It could be generated like some one added back parts "Umińska" like u wrote can have meaning a "Someone who do sth" but more polish surnames it's became from someone gave herself. Polish Surnames had history. But the names of course could have some meaning Lea - "Female Hebrew origin derived from Le'ah" means "cow" or Latin for "lioness". :)

 

In that case i think Lea Umińska means someone who u can trust and truthful.

 

"she will be based on the ability to build good relationships with the environment. These are the makings to achieve a lot. In this paper, Lea can count on a smile fate and powerful allies, and the wisdom and honesty will be the motto of the professional. Sometimes there will be beneficial suggestions. Lea's name carries a good prognosis for social advancement."


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Jeśli Śnisz właściwy sen, staje się on rzeczywistością...

 

If you're dreaming a proper dream, it becomes a reality ...


#32 debro

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 13:49

I have an issue with how the VAs pronounce the names... even in the starting lines the VA makes an awkward pause before saying "Kian Alvane" (and it sounds as it was read). Even a few characters seem to have problems pronouncing their own names.

 

And to complicate things more.

 

Zoë's last name is Castillo. Which since Dreamfall was pronounced as a Spanish or Latin person would. Almost every spanish speaking person would pronounce it very similar to what she does, but NOT argentinians.

 

In the conversation with Queenie, she asks Zoe if her lastname is spanish, and she answers "Argentinian".

 

Argentinians (as myself) would pronounce it like "CastiSHo". We have a very distinctive way of speaking spanish. 

 

It's a minor thing... but i thought i could bring it up :)

 

PS: and it seems we still exist in the 2200s! yay! :P


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#33 DollyDagger

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 14:01

Debro - interesting post! Maybe pronunciations have changed over 200 yrs, though? Or maybe it's because Zoe didn't grow up in Argentina. My real name is Greek, but I probably pronounce it in a more anglicised way than a native Greek speaker would.



#34 debro

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 14:08

Debro - interesting post! Maybe pronunciations have changed over 200 yrs, though? Or maybe it's because Zoe didn't grow up in Argentina. My real name is Greek, but I probably pronounce it in a more anglicised way than a native Greek speaker would.

 

Yes it might be. We don't even know if Zoe's father was argentinian himself. :P

 

I recall Zoe saying she was born in India and raised in Africa. But I don't remember any reference to where Gabriel was born.


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#35 Silvirish4ever

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 09:48

Argentinians (as myself) would pronounce it like "CastiSHo". We have a very distinctive way of speaking spanish. 

 

Haha that's true!

 

But I don't see an issue with Zoë not pronouncing it the Argentinian way. AFAIK, she said that the name was Argentinian, but she never said that she lived there - we don't even know if she speaks Spanish. Then again, she doesn't say "Castillo" the English way, either. Weird. Maybe she got into the habit of pronouncing the "ll" the "standard Spanish way" for spelling purposes (as a Spanish foreigner myself, I know how hard it is for others to get your family names right).

 

My guess is that her father, Gabriel, is Argentinian. In Dreamfall I didn't catch a Spanish accent, but then again he never actually said his name or surname.


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#36 saidsrc

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:17

Haha that's true!

 

But I don't see an issue with Zoë not pronouncing it the Argentinian way. AFAIK, she said that the name was Argentinian, but she never said that she lived there - we don't even know if she speaks Spanish. Then again, she doesn't say "Castillo" the English way, either. Weird. Maybe she got into the habit of pronouncing the "ll" the "standard Spanish way" for spelling purposes (as a Spanish foreigner myself, I know how hard it is for others to get your family names right).

 

My guess is that her father, Gabriel, is Argentinian. In Dreamfall I didn't catch a Spanish accent, but then again he never actually said his name or surname.

 

Her pronunciation is also the French pronunciation of "Castillo". In Dreamfall she was living in a French speaking community, Casablanca. Maybe it has nothing to do with Spanish. Maybe that's why.



#37 Silvirish4ever

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 11:24

Her pronunciation is also the French pronunciation of "Castillo". In Dreamfall she was living in a French speaking community, Casablanca. Maybe it has nothing to do with Spanish. Maybe that's why.

 

Wut? How is "Castillo" pronounced in French...? :blink: AFAIK, all French words have the stress in the last syllable.  


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#38 debro

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 14:25

Haha that's true!

 

But I don't see an issue with Zoë not pronouncing it the Argentinian way. AFAIK, she said that the name was Argentinian, but she never said that she lived there - we don't even know if she speaks Spanish. Then again, she doesn't say "Castillo" the English way, either. Weird. Maybe she got into the habit of pronouncing the "ll" the "standard Spanish way" for spelling purposes (as a Spanish foreigner myself, I know how hard it is for others to get your family names right).

 

My guess is that her father, Gabriel, is Argentinian. In Dreamfall I didn't catch a Spanish accent, but then again he never actually said his name or surname.

Yes, we don't know if Gabriel is Argentinian either.

 

And regarding the origin of the lastname "Castillo", it IS spanish. There's no way its origin is argentinian. We were a spanish colony, and most of the lastnames are either spanish or from other places in europe. Aboriginal surnames are very different. It might be that Zoe's family is of argentinian origin and that's why she said that.


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#39 saidsrc

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 14:53

Wut? How is "Castillo" pronounced in French...? :blink: AFAIK, all French words have the stress in the last syllable.  

https://translate.go...#fr/en/castillo

https://translate.go...#es/en/castillo

 

You can use Google's text to speech engine to compare the pronunciations, just click on the speaker image. 

I'm talking about the "ll" (double L) pronunciation btw. Castillo isn't a French word, but a francophone would pronounce it very similar to Spanish. 



#40 Silvirish4ever

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 16:22

https://translate.go...#fr/en/castillo

https://translate.go...#es/en/castillo

 

You can use Google's text to speech engine to compare the pronunciations, just click on the speaker image. 

I'm talking about the "ll" (double L) pronunciation btw. Castillo isn't a French word, but a francophone would pronounce it very similar to Spanish. 

 

Okay, but the way she pronounced it is Spanish, not French. Just, not Argentinian (or Uruguayan) Spanish. Nor Catalan (which has the "ll" more pronounced, like the Italian "gl"). But Spanish nonetheless...


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